03
Feb 10

Daily Links for January 15th through February 3rd

All excerpts are quoted from the respective link(s).

  • The Future of Search: Social Relevancy Rank – What we are about to get is a Social Relevancy Rank. Whenever you search streams of activity, the results will be ordered not chronologically but by how relevant each is to you based on your social graph. That is, people who matter more to you will bubble up. How does this work? Well, there will be a formula, just as there is a formula for Page Rank.
  • Saturday Evening Post Covers – Fine Art Reproductions of Iconic Illustrations – The complete archive of the Saturday Evening Post cover illustrations has been opened and hundreds of these iconic images are available as fine art reproductions. The remastered images are published as fine articles available on paper or canvas. These classic images recall a simpler time as well as representing the golden age of illustration. In addition to the complete archive of Norman Rockwell covers, we offer hundereds of other timeless cover illustrations.
  • Here’s Why Attempts To Cut The Deficit Will Definitely Make The Nation Poorer – Unfortunately, he’s got it backwards. The deficits he decries actually help to sustain demand and create jobs, thereby supporting the economy — not destroying it. And he reflects a commonly held belief that growing government debt represents a burden on our children and grandchildren, implicitly suggesting that future generations will have to reduce consumption in order to pay the taxes required to pay off the outstanding debt. Related to this is the fallacy that too much bond issuance will create a “debtors’ revolt”, whereby “the markets” will force the country to pay higher interest rates in order to “fund” its spending.
  • iPhone 3G S Carries $178.96 BOM and Manufacturing Cost, iSuppli Teardown Reveals  – iSuppli – My Observation: Apple's cost to add 3G capability to the iPod Touch would be under $30, based on iSuppli's tear-down of the iPhone 3GS.
  • 20+ mind-blowing social media statistics revisited | Blog | Econsultancy
  • The Data Digest: Trending Consumers’ Interest In Netbooks – What we see is that consumers are mostly interested in netbooks as a second or third PC that they could use while on the go, or that they consider giving one to their children.
  • iPad or Kindle: will our wallets decide? — Engadget – In quite a few ways, Apple's iPad and iBooks announcement today was a shot across the bow of Amazon's Kindle. Sure, Apple played nice, even saying that Amazon has done a "great job of pioneering" the e-book space, but you can't help but think that Apple thinks of itself as the evolution of the Kindle, not mere competition. Steve Jobs says that Apple is going to "stand on their shoulders," and that doesn't sound quite as benign as perhaps he meant it. So, how do the devices stack up, specifically as book consuming devices? Well, for starters, one of these things costs a whole lot more than the other… let's break it down after the break.
  • Psychological Tests for Student Use
  • Social Influence Marketing Trends
  • Razorfish – Fluent – The Social Influence Marketing Report
  • Understand Your Customers’ Social Behaviors – Applying Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs to participation with Online Social Media.
  • The social behavior incentive (how your app can be as addictive as Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare) – So, how can you make your own app addictive?
  • Timeline of Personhood Rights and Powers [Corporate versus Personal] – A pdf timeline.
  • Political math: 37 > 63 – James Fallows – Senators representing 63 percent of the public vote for the bill; those representing 37 percent vote against it. The bill fails.
  • Transparency: State-by-state Abortion Rates – Transparency – GOOD – Congress is trying to wrap up health-care reform this week. One of the major issues in the bill has been whether it would provide government funding for abortions, which—as with anything to do with the abortion issue—has resulted in much vitriol. In thinking about the debate, it's good to have a grasp on the scope of the issue. This is a graphic of the abortion rates around the country.
  • The Indispensible Ideas of 2009 – Harvard Business Review – 2009 was a year of unprecedented change. The global economic crisis caused us to reevaluate every aspect of business, from strategy to innovation to managing resources. Throughout all of this, Harvard Business Press remained a trusted source for the best ideas and advice on weathering tough economic times.

    Selected by leading business publications worldwide, below are the Harvard Business Press books that topped 2009’s "Best of" lists. These titles not only wowed the critics, they also helped thousands of managers like you survive and thrive in today’s complex business world.

  • A Writing Revolution § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM – In our analysis, we considered an author’s text “published” if 100 or more people read it. (Reaching 100 people may seem inconsequential, but new-media messages are often re-broadcast by recipients, and then by their recipients, and so on. In this way, a message can “go viral,” reaching millions.) Extrapolation of the Twitter-author curve (the dashed line) predicts that every person will publish in 2013. That is the ceiling: 100 percent participation. Provided current growth continues, the prediction of imminence is robust. Increasing the stringency of the criterion for “publishing” from 100 to 1,000 readers would reduce new-media authorship tenfold, but merely delays the predicted 100 percent participation by a year under this model.

21
Jun 09

Daily Links for June 20th through June 21st

  • Financial Responsibility in the United States – A credit infographic from BillShrink.
  • Historical Home Prices – A dynamic chart/infographic of the US economy and home prices.
  • Flip Flop Fly Ball – Essentially, this site is what I'd have been doing when I was 12 years old had the Internet and Photoshop been available to me in the eighties. As well as the infographics there are a few other bits and bobs; like small pixiliated portraits of some baseball players. They are filleted from a bigger collection of Minipops (that's what I call them) which is one of the biggest parts of my main web site, Flip Flop Flyin' (thus the name of this site). There's also some photos from some of the stadiums I've visited, and a few drawings.
  • The HBR List 2009 – Our annual HBR Breakthrough Ideas List spans from Africa to the economy, from Western Union to state capitalism, and from biomimicry to something called the IKEA Effect…

02
Mar 09

Daily Links for March 1st

  • Ethnographic Research: A Key to Strategy – HBR.org – Corporate ethnography isn’t just for innovation anymore. It’s central to gaining a full understanding of your customers and the business itself. The ethnographic work at my company, Intel, and other firms now informs functions such as strategy and long-range planning.

06
Nov 08

Daily Links for November 5th

  • Obama’s Seven Lessons for Radical Innovators – Umair Haque – Barack Obama is one of the most radical management innovators in the world today. Obama's team built something truly world-changing: a new kind of political organization for the 21st century. It differs from yesterday's political organizations as much as Google and Threadless differ from yesterday's corporations: all are a tiny handful of truly new, 21st century institutions in the world today.

    Obama presidential bid succeeded, in other words, as our research at the Lab has discussed for the past several years, through the power of new DNA: new rules for new kinds of institutions.

    So let's discuss the new DNA Obama brought to the table, by outlining seven rules for tomorrow's radical innovators.

  • Proud To Be an American « blog maverick – How do you stimulate and turn around the economy in this day and age ? Motivate those who in the past couldn’t , wouldn’t or didn’t, into those who can and do. Motivate those who can and do, to continue to innovate and increase productivity.

    As any successful CEO will tell you, leadership, vision and motivation has far more impact on results than any tax cut or increase. While I prefer lower taxes, I can tell you that no entrepreneur or CEO worth a damn in this country gives up or works less because of a change in tax policy. In this country you work harder to achieve your dreams and goals.

    I can honestly say that I never thought that I would see a black President in my lifetime. I’m incredibly proud and excited to be part of this moment in our history. I believe that the election of President Obama will energize many, many more of our fellow citizens to work harder to achieve our goals.

    I’m Bullish on America.

  • Election maps – [S]tates are drawn with size proportional not to their acreage but to the number of their inhabitants, states with more people appearing larger than states with fewer, regardless of their actual area on the ground. On such a map, for example, the state of Rhode Island, with its 1.1 million inhabitants, would appear about twice the size of Wyoming, which has half a million, even though Wyoming has 60 times the acreage of Rhode Island.
  • McCain’s Revenge – The Daily Beast – But subconciously McCain knew a win would vindicate the Republican Party, and as a former victim of its smear campaigns, he couldn't let that happen. He undermined his own credibility by choosing the inexperienced Palin. The campaign further undercut the Palin pick when a campaign aid told the press that she was "going rogue" and a "diva," an admission of contempt for her and, by extension, for the voting bloc she represented.

    Dr. Karasu said "there's a greater pleasure in the unconsciousness of revenge – it's more powerful than success." If anything, McCain's loss exemplifies that and plays in to his victim complex. He should be satisfied that his revenge on the Republican Party is perfectly complete.

  • Elections Blog: Turnout – My preliminary national turnout rate for those eligible to vote is 62.6% or 133.3 million ballots cast. This number may yet rise further as absentee ballots arrive and provisional ballots are processed, particularly in some western states. Until these outstanding ballots are counted, I would like to provide a conservative estimate. This turnout rate would be the largest since the 62.8% of 1964. If we top that number, which we might, the next highest turnout rate would be 63.8% in 1960.
  • Too much explanation – Paul Krugman – Op-Ed Columnist – New York Times Blog – I’m reading a lot about why Obama won, with long lists of stuff — it was the Palin effect, it was the skill of the Obama campaign, it was the 50-state strategy, etc..

    At the risk of being a party-pooper, I’ll second Andrew Gelman: there’s not much evidence in the vote for anything besides a broad shift to Democrats, almost the same (~8%) across all the states, and probably a reaction to the state of the economy, stupid. There were a few big anomalies in McCain’s direction — what’s the matter with Arkansas? — and a few in Obama’s, mainly Indiana.

    But basically there was a national wave against Republicans, suggesting that we don’t need a complex narrative.

  • Daily Kos: Bottled Hot Water Collection – Worst Greatest Hits.