04
Jun 13

Tying Chris Christie’s Stomach into Gordian Knots

The Governor really has no great positions here.  The electorate of the people’s Republic of New Jersey will demand a moderate (knowing full well that it is the Governor’s prerogative to nominate an interim Senator of his own party to replace the recently deceased Frank Lautenberg).  The batshit insane wing of his own party will take such a move as tantamount to treason, and would all but torpedo Christie’s chances in 2016.  If he nominates a full-blown wingnut not only will said presumptive nominee get massacred in the special election (and it’s not like appointees do particularly well anyway), but the stink of failure and the insane rhetoric sure to flow from that candidate will stick to Christie and ruin all that bipartisan good will and love he gets from the blue and purple electorate in the northeast and mid-Atlantic.

Couldn’t happen to a nicer guy.


24
Nov 10

Fickle Americans and “Gate Rape”

Attention, information, knowledge and awareness can be amazing things (photo from Jon Gruber’s flickr stream)..

Touchy Touchy

Continue reading →


27
Feb 10

Oh What a Feeling! Toyota?

I’ve wanted to do a post on the slow motion car wreck that is the Toyota story, but I just haven’t had the time.   This is a subject that satisfies several of my interests, from automobiles to politics to organizational dynamics, and I’ve followed it closely.   So instead, here’s a collection of links ¦ Continue reading →


03
Feb 10

Daily Links for January 15th through February 3rd

All excerpts are quoted from the respective link(s).

  • The Future of Search: Social Relevancy Rank – What we are about to get is a Social Relevancy Rank. Whenever you search streams of activity, the results will be ordered not chronologically but by how relevant each is to you based on your social graph. That is, people who matter more to you will bubble up. How does this work? Well, there will be a formula, just as there is a formula for Page Rank.
  • Saturday Evening Post Covers – Fine Art Reproductions of Iconic Illustrations – The complete archive of the Saturday Evening Post cover illustrations has been opened and hundreds of these iconic images are available as fine art reproductions. The remastered images are published as fine articles available on paper or canvas. These classic images recall a simpler time as well as representing the golden age of illustration. In addition to the complete archive of Norman Rockwell covers, we offer hundereds of other timeless cover illustrations.
  • Here’s Why Attempts To Cut The Deficit Will Definitely Make The Nation Poorer – Unfortunately, he’s got it backwards. The deficits he decries actually help to sustain demand and create jobs, thereby supporting the economy — not destroying it. And he reflects a commonly held belief that growing government debt represents a burden on our children and grandchildren, implicitly suggesting that future generations will have to reduce consumption in order to pay the taxes required to pay off the outstanding debt. Related to this is the fallacy that too much bond issuance will create a “debtors’ revolt”, whereby “the markets” will force the country to pay higher interest rates in order to “fund” its spending.
  • iPhone 3G S Carries $178.96 BOM and Manufacturing Cost, iSuppli Teardown Reveals  – iSuppli – My Observation: Apple's cost to add 3G capability to the iPod Touch would be under $30, based on iSuppli's tear-down of the iPhone 3GS.
  • 20+ mind-blowing social media statistics revisited | Blog | Econsultancy
  • The Data Digest: Trending Consumers’ Interest In Netbooks – What we see is that consumers are mostly interested in netbooks as a second or third PC that they could use while on the go, or that they consider giving one to their children.
  • iPad or Kindle: will our wallets decide? — Engadget – In quite a few ways, Apple's iPad and iBooks announcement today was a shot across the bow of Amazon's Kindle. Sure, Apple played nice, even saying that Amazon has done a "great job of pioneering" the e-book space, but you can't help but think that Apple thinks of itself as the evolution of the Kindle, not mere competition. Steve Jobs says that Apple is going to "stand on their shoulders," and that doesn't sound quite as benign as perhaps he meant it. So, how do the devices stack up, specifically as book consuming devices? Well, for starters, one of these things costs a whole lot more than the other… let's break it down after the break.
  • Psychological Tests for Student Use
  • Social Influence Marketing Trends
  • Razorfish – Fluent – The Social Influence Marketing Report
  • Understand Your Customers’ Social Behaviors – Applying Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs to participation with Online Social Media.
  • The social behavior incentive (how your app can be as addictive as Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare) – So, how can you make your own app addictive?
  • Timeline of Personhood Rights and Powers [Corporate versus Personal] – A pdf timeline.
  • Political math: 37 > 63 – James Fallows – Senators representing 63 percent of the public vote for the bill; those representing 37 percent vote against it. The bill fails.
  • Transparency: State-by-state Abortion Rates – Transparency – GOOD – Congress is trying to wrap up health-care reform this week. One of the major issues in the bill has been whether it would provide government funding for abortions, which—as with anything to do with the abortion issue—has resulted in much vitriol. In thinking about the debate, it's good to have a grasp on the scope of the issue. This is a graphic of the abortion rates around the country.
  • The Indispensible Ideas of 2009 – Harvard Business Review – 2009 was a year of unprecedented change. The global economic crisis caused us to reevaluate every aspect of business, from strategy to innovation to managing resources. Throughout all of this, Harvard Business Press remained a trusted source for the best ideas and advice on weathering tough economic times.

    Selected by leading business publications worldwide, below are the Harvard Business Press books that topped 2009’s "Best of" lists. These titles not only wowed the critics, they also helped thousands of managers like you survive and thrive in today’s complex business world.

  • A Writing Revolution § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM – In our analysis, we considered an author’s text “published” if 100 or more people read it. (Reaching 100 people may seem inconsequential, but new-media messages are often re-broadcast by recipients, and then by their recipients, and so on. In this way, a message can “go viral,” reaching millions.) Extrapolation of the Twitter-author curve (the dashed line) predicts that every person will publish in 2013. That is the ceiling: 100 percent participation. Provided current growth continues, the prediction of imminence is robust. Increasing the stringency of the criterion for “publishing” from 100 to 1,000 readers would reduce new-media authorship tenfold, but merely delays the predicted 100 percent participation by a year under this model.

29
Jan 10

Saving our Democracy by being less Democratic?

Every now and then, something Ron Paul says appeals to me.   I’ll see your Tenth Amendment argument and raise you the 17th (Tony Blankley at HuffPo divined from a speech at CPAC in 2009):

As an early 1960s vintage member of the then-new conservative movement, I remember us focusing on the 10th amendment during the 1964 Goldwater campaign. It has been a staple of conservative thought, and the continued dormancy of 10th amendment enforcement has been one of the failures of our now half-century-old movement.

But just as the Tea Party movement in so many ways seems to represent the 2.0 version of our movement, so I again thought about the 10th amendment anew. After about 10 seconds’ thought, it struck me that the best way to revive the 10th Amendment is to repeal the 17th Amendment — which changes the first paragraph of Article I, Section 3 of the Constitution to provide that each state’s senators are to be “elected by the people thereof” rather than being “chosen by the Legislature thereof.” (As I Googled the topic, I found out that Ron Paul and others have been talking about this for years. It may be the only subject that could be proposed and ratified at a constitutional convention with three-fourths of the state legislatures.)

Digby explains:

That’s a fabulous idea. Let’s let the much cheaper local whores do the bidding of the corporations. These poor companies are going to have to spend a lot more money if they expect to buy 435 House seats and endless local and state offices, so any break they can get would be good for the economy.

That was not one of them.   Fifty little corrupt House of Lords would not be better than the US Congress.